Monday, December 26, 2011

MS. ANONYMOUS: NATURAL HAIR DEBATE & DISCUSSION

DISCLAIMER: This letter doesn't express any of my personal views or opinions. I feel that the anonymous person chose me to discuss this touchy subject because I can remain unbiased and objective. I opted not to share a debate & discussion in video form  on youtube because of 2010's dramatics with Kimmaytube.  However, I think that because it's clear this is being talked about on forums and blogs, it can be discussed and addressed on a platform built on integrity, community and respect. Now I do feel there is a tone of "hatin" in this letter and if I was to receive the same opportunities and blessings as the women mentioned, I would be on Ms. Anonymous' shit talkin' list as well. However, I want to believe that it's more about the frustration that the black hair care industry being dominated by Asians and NOW the natural hair industry being controlled by those who don't look like the consumers they advertise to. The natural hair community and surge of natural hair women isn't all empowerment, or sharing and caring, but a lucrative money driven industry that if your lucky, you have some part in. What are your thoughts?





50 comments:

  1. Wow that letter was certainly enlightening but then again I am not surprised. Its disappointing but somewhat typical that other races are using African Americans to uplift their own and increase their bank roll. Unfortunately in American we as blacks are seen as stepping stones on the road to success. We as united people need to be more resourceful and enlightened on how can enable our own success. So now that the information is out there are we willing to make a change. Are we going to stop going to this website and unsubscribe from the above mention YTers? I have never used curlynikki as resource for caring about my natural hair but I am a subscriber to one of the persons mentioned above. I feel as though if I unsubscribe I am contradicting myself and my community about being united. Maybe this letter should stand as an eye opener so more people will be aware and we can find another outlet to get natural hair information to the masses without having to assimilate.

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  2. @mikegirl I don't think that black vloggers or bloggers who gain benefits from their work is hardly the problem. I've personally used both sites mentioned in the letter above three years ago, and they both offer valuable information. Hell, Im a natural hair vlogger for NaturallyCurly.com which I think some people forget. I wonder to the onlooker, if the problem is seeing black women succeed with the help of non blacks, or growing their brand by collaborating with large established businesses. I just feel that the tone of the letter was a tad bitter, and envious, because whether the person looks like you or not, if they are helping your cause, and possibly getting you closer to financial freedom I don't see the problem .

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  3. First and foremost business is business. I'm not mad at any vlogger or blogger getting some shine or paper. However, I hope nothing gets lost in the sauce so to speak. I don't want anyone to be so beholden to the ownership that they end up steering readers/viewers in the wrong direction.

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  4. I don't know if the person is being envious or not. I mean some of the same points mentioned are similar to those you made about a popular hair steamer in a previous video. You said the face of it was black but it was made in China like everything else. The natural hair community has grown and many black people are benefiting from it, but it could become even greater. I'm not going to lie, call it being racial if you want but, I like seeing young black owners doing their thing. It's the main reason I buy from some of them even though I feel like ordering online is a hassle. Integrity can be lost when some things are bought out by a bigger entity with a different agenda. Maybe that's the main concern.

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  5. I wonder if it's a simple dollar and sense (pun intended) issue. According to an article in Reuters published in 2008, the Buying power of African Americans is projected to be 1.1 trillion dollars in 2012! It makes sense for any group, white,Asian, purple or green, to try and leverage the amount of money we as blacks will spend. If an environment is created for us to discuss challenges, issues, etc., with our hair, and that environment is plastered with ads for products, who is really benefitting from it? Unfortunately, the owners of the site generally benefit the most

    I'm all for anyone getting ahead financially, I only wish that we could get ahead without the assistance of another race.

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  6. Everything this letter says is correct in fact all of the information presented is right on their website. I have mixed feelings about this because Black people have nothing and it certainly isn't the fault of these two smart-minded business women who happen to be white. Alicia W. sold her business for whatever price and she has a right to do so. However there is a silver lining. They have opened the door wide open for a 100% black owned company who could possibly be a direct competitor. Bottom line is money talks.

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  7. I don't think the author of this letter was "hating" or envious. Maybe she was stating her opinion.....The term " hating" is overused and abused. She did make. Slid points....

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  8. *make valid points. (doggone iPhone)

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  9. Melisaa made a great statement. No one seems to be hating. Speaking out on selling out is not hating, it's observing and discussing. I wish that the word "hating" wasn't used to describe everything you don't agree with now a days. It's become a way to dismiss someone's opinion when they don't fall in line.

    Curly Nikki's site was made great by readers and the content is questionable. How many ways can one wear a twist out? In my opinion, she's no authority but because she was popular, white entities chose to use her to make money. They penetrated a market using a sister because they know the natural hair movement is about removing the chains of a Euro aesthetic standard so they couldn't step to the forefront without a representative.


    Yes, it's business, but all business isn't good business. This is our culture and community dollars being taken away yet again.

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  10. @Melissa When I say "hating" Im referring to them referencing vloggers. I don't see problems with vloggers getting any compensation (considering Im a vlogger myself). All of the above mentioned blogs and vlogs have had success because of dedication and hard works, so whether they benefit money wise I don't see how that is a problem, UNLESS you felt they are being dishonest. I say its hating, because there is no evidence that any have been dishonest or shady, so what is the problem really. Hey NaturallyCurly.com didn't do anything that another blog couldn't do if they put their minds to it.

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  11. The questfortheperfectcurl.com owner has said that she is not owned NaturallyCurly.com... She does reviews for them, but that's it. It has no control over her blog.

    http://questfortheperfectcurl.com/2011/12/26/response-to-ms-anonymous-africanexports-blog/

    So this post is not entirely true.

    Now as for CurlyNikki.com... I always thought (for myself) that there was a partnership between CurlyNikki and NaturallyCurly... She IS listed as a tab at the top of their site... But that doesn't change the content of her site. Her posts are a mix of her life, and other natural hair blogs, and if she's getting money, then she's getting money.

    Overall, I think the writer was stretching... When she said NaturallyCurly was bankrolling everyone, she made it seem as if they paid all of those vloggers to run their blogs. NC probably just pays them to do reviews. Oh well. Who cares? As long as it doesn't change their opinion and as long as I'm getting good content.

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  12. And this "informant" is probably one of those bitter, failed natural hair vloggers... not sayin' no names! but uhhh... just sayin'!

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  13. Personally I don't have an opinion about any of this because I want healthy hair! And I will listen to whomever will help me with the growth and promotion of MY HAIR! Make your money, get your money, and live a life that you are comfortable with. So CurlyNikki.com is the the owner, but is she still benefiting from her face? I don't see the problem there. And NaturallyCurly is what? Showing and telling the natural hair community where to go for salons, hairtyping, and/or products? I really don't understand the problem. Can someone please explain to me what the problem really is? Because if you don't like other races taking over black people's creations or ideas, then you do something about it... Everyone has to start from somewhere and have to be backed by someone!

    I sometimes feel like other black people don't want to see other black people get bigger, so their not going to buy out some of these ideas.. Other races don't mind spending money to make money no matter color or race. JUST MY THOUGHTS!

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  14. Should we then stop listening to artists like Lil Wayne whose label, Cash Money Records is owned by Universal/Motown which is a subsidiary of a French Media group called Vivendi? Just let business be business. We are an interdependent global community. Crabs in a bucket...

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  15. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  16. @TH I do agree that business is business, and the hating I speak of is based on the mentions of the vloggers who've built great reputations in the natural hair community and are reaping the benefits. I don't see how one's hard work that pays off is ever a negative and to make it seem as though vloggers are sell outs is hating in my opinion. I think that your view on the financial gain from non black entrepreneurs is the point Ms Anonymous was TRYING to convey, which is important to discuss.

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  17. Thanks for posting the letter. I get what the anonymous poster is trying to say and I didn't get that she was trying to "hate" on the bloggers/vloggers that are being paid by non-black sources.

    The problem is not that bloggers/vloggers are paid for their product reviews or website content. The problem is that HISTORY IS REPEATING ITSELF ONCE AGAIN. Non-black companies are now using black bloggers/vloggers to gain FINANCIAL inroads into the natural hair industry so we will once again become dependent on non-black hair companies for our products.

    I'm all for entrepreneurs getting paid and growing their business and I don't blame alicia one bit for selling her business to naturallycurly.com; it was a good business move for HER but I don't think it was good for the black women of the natural hair community.

    This has always happened to us. Small black companies grow their reputation and customer base and get bought out by non-black companies which do not recycle those dollars back into the black communities that they serve. I do have a problem with that. But as we all know money talks and that's all anyone REALLY cares about.

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  18. @Sylestial lol, girl I wouldn't care what label Wayne is on because he is a ignorant midget (PC term little person) if I ever did see one lol. But I cant lie some of his songs are hot, just not a fan . The question is , "are you comfortable supporting, getting information about hair, and the black natural hair experience from a non black person?

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  19. Its the same thing with BET selling out to a white owner.

    There is nothing wrong with wanting black business to grow without the ownership of other races.

    Its not about anyone hating because honestly there is no reason to hate. Its not like vloggers/bloggers have some special skill. Anyone with a camera can create videos and post to youtube.

    Why can't we have an Oprah or Tyler Perry of the natural hair community. Neither one of them has sold out. Both are still black owned.

    Yet people commenting on forums are called "haters" because they'd rather see the black community rise and own their own hair companies and the like. You can't knock people for being honest.

    If you want to collect a paycheck from a non black owned company for doing reviews of a product used for black hair then thats your business.

    The forum thread that you reposted was just a discussion about why the natural hair industry is being outsourced by other races just like a lot of other minority focused industries.

    I don't think anyone was saying not to watch you tubers or read hair blogs just bringing light to a situation that people don't want to talk about openly.

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  20. I do think what struck a chord with me is the possibility that once again we will lose control over an an industry that is FUBU. It is awful to see the control the Koreans have over the hair industry and have essentially locked out specifically African Americans out of a business that we bankroll. I am not saying this letter is true. But natural hair industry is big business, and it will not take long for everyone else to find that out, and get their stake in it. The only problem with that, is that we are the ones constantly locked out of our own playing field.

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  21. We want black businesses to grow but at the same time we need to check ourselves and allow them to be great. I've never been a big fan of Carol's Daughters products but I don't knock her hustle at all. She put Cassie in an ad campaign and people lost their minds. WHERE DA DARK SKINNED GIRLS AT? lol Whatever. Look at at the mainstream companies. They are all doing a "natural" line. It's the same thing Lisa Price has been doing for years. Surprise! Surpise! The products she uses for us can be used by all. Let's not stifle her growth or those like her because the spokesperson doesn't look like "us".

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  22. @TH, I understand and wholeheartedly agree with what you are saying. The most important question now is "What are we going to DO about it?". Shall we sit back and watch? Didn't we think that people of other races would attempt to benefit from the black community (as usual)? Where there is a market, no matter what it is, someone will make moves to control it. With the right attitude, this letter can be the motivating factor in the creation of our own sites, businesses, organizations, etc. to serve the natural hair community. Like Vanisha said, Naturally curly isn't doing ANYTHING that any of us can't do. Personally, I think it's time to get to work!

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  23. I see where the author of this letter is coming from however, what is the problem with "other races" monopolizing products and corporations especially if the products work. If Carol's Daughter was owned by a Korean but the products were the same, would that be an issue? Someone's culture, the language they speak, and the amount of melanin he/she happens to be born with shouldn't be an issue; only the quality of the product. .-_-

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  24. The only issue I have with the curlynikki site is that it is promoted like a personal blog. It would be more honest if she did something similar to vloggers/bloggers when they are paid (or receive free product) to do a review. Just keep things open, honest and let readers make their own choice.

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  25. The info on nc.com is no secret. Its very professional in my opion. Its not a conspiracy. Those women happened to learn that not just White women fall into their target market. So they segmented using a hair typing system & adapted to demand. As a business major I think that acquiring curlynikki and vloggers was the logical next step in their strategy. I have nothing against the women who took the initiative to start this community. Why haven't all the popular Black vloggers, bloggers, product
    manufacturers united to start an online community for people of color. I believe it would be successful if done well. I would love to get out there and provide competition for nc.com.

    I'm just trying to say that we can't knock people for taking initiative. Natueal hair care market has buying power even though most African Americans believe we are crazy. Unfortunately if Black people don't invest in what belongs to to us, another race will. Leaving us to play catch up.

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  26. I don't see any problem with a blogger/vlogger being able to make income from what they are doing. Would it be great if the naturally curly brand was owned by Black people? Yes. But just because it's not doesn't make the resources any less valuable, or the bloggers/vloggers who do things on their behalf any less informative or those individuals any less caring of Black women and their natural hair quests.

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  27. I don't think we can assume the person is envious or 'hatin.' Because text is just that 'text' we have a habit of giving it an emotion we think may fit. The person did not use any derogatory or disrespectful language, and I did not get the same you felt after reading. That is a matter of perspective and I don't think we should place an emotion on text unless clear disrespectful wording is used.

    I think the African American race can be a bit impatient and not willing to wait for the big pay off. If the information shared is true, the business women who bought out the bloggers are investing in preparation for the long term payoff instead of instant gratification. That is one of the reasons I do admire Kimmaytube. I truly feel she is willing to wait and reap the long term benefit of her business. On the flip side, I do not feel any sort of way about the ladies who chose to sell. They made a decision that was very well theirs to make. I will say I don't want to hear any of the ladies who chose to sell complain later about the distribution of natural hair information.

    This is nothing new, it's been this way for the longest. I'm not surprised. I will say some of us need to fall back because if the shoe were on the other foot, I wonder if anything would be different.

    I would hope this doesn't get ugly. If this upsets you, find things you can do that can positively make a change that's more favorable to you. Don't interfere with anyone's decisions they have every right to make.

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  28. @Kina There is so much going on in the letter, that its hard to zero in on all of the points they were trying to make. I think its valid to be frustrated to some degree, but like said before, "if you don't like something, be the change you want to see". Complaining helps nothing. As for the big payoff I don't know exactly what that would consist of, and if there is a such thing regarding the natural hair industry only a handful will benefit, leaving it to be controlled and dominated and corporately controlled. I see it as a grassroots vs cooperate debate. Either side has valid points

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  29. Possibly, it was was the entrepreneur's plan from the start to grow and sell their business. Many people flip businesses all the time.

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  30. I agree with the author of the letter 100%. No other race would buy commodities targeted at their race/ethnicity from black folks but we buy from everyone else. Can you imagine Asians buying from a black owned Indian grocery store or Chinese restaurant? It would never happen. I’m not shocked that many black folks don’t have a gripe with other races dominating our industries. This is why Black people have little to no private property. Most are only interested in making money rather than building wealth. Maybe some of the ladies who sold their businesses will re-invest in another or maybe they won’t. It’s entirely their choice.

    I do agree with Kina's comments about KimmayTube and would say this is also applicable to YouTubers such as Blackonyx and NaturalSunshine. Very proud of these ladies!

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  31. "Are you comfortable supporting, getting information about hair, and the black natural hair experience from a non black person"...

    That is a GREAT question AE. One thing we need to keep in mind is that Oprah, Tyler Perry, and JZ (can't bring myself to talk about Wezzy) at some point worked for and were supported by others (insert any “other”) until they were able to build their brand, network, and work for themselves.

    I would LOVE to see more black people owning a larger stake in the natural hair business, however, I know that it's going to take time (quality & presentation in the products) from them and support (money and word-of-mouth) from us.

    I think the original post made it a point to call out certain blogs and vloggers, but I think what's lacking is... so what is the original commenter doing about it? Are they in the midst of creating a 100% black owned natural hair business and inviting other black vloggers to partake in it? I always have to question the motives of those that are "outing" others but then don't want to put a face on their own comments. Maybe it's for a good reason, I don't know, but I'm just sayin'.

    As for the vloggers mentioned above (CharyJay, Taren916, Kimmaytube, and AE) in addition to bringing us information about hair, each one of them has shared their very personal stories with us... life lessons learned, personal testimonies, past struggles, taking us behind the scenes in their business, etc). These women shared these things with us and they didn't have to, if it was all about some 'ol dead effin' follicles. It seems like such a slap in the face that one (meaning the original commentor) would discount all that these ladies have tried to bring to the forefront simply because of choices they have made over their own hair, be it business or otherwise. When I look at each of those ladies, I see beautiful black women making decisions to control their destinies, and sharing what they have learned with us so that we can do the same. Is that not freedom and independence?

    Lastly the statement "Natural hair was meant to be a movement that represented FREEDOM and INDEPENDENCE for black woman", tells me a few things about author of this post, all of which gets the side eye. CIVIL RIGHTS was a movement, natural hair is just a choice. I am free and independent with my natural hair or with a relaxer. The ironic thing is white people have no problem with my natural hair. Unfortunately, mostly black women/men seem to have the most negative things to say about my hair. From why don't I straighten it, why don't I try this gel to define your curl pattern (no curl pattern here), and then there's the natural hair Nazis trying to be the law on what natural hair is. These are the one that try to "confine" me.

    If the information about natural hair is scientifically factual and based on the truth, it will have my support be it black owned or not... but I will opt black owned if given the chance.

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  32. One of the things that I so enjoy about the natural hair care movement is that we as women are working together. Working together means sharing information with one another as well as supporting our own finically. I enjoyed the fact of knowing that this was something that belonged to us and our support alone helped grow it into the major movement it is today. So to find out that CurlyNikki.com is not a black/women owned site is a little surprising to me. I am a little disappointed that a black woman needed other women of another ethnic group to help us shed light on our own hair texture, how to take care of our own hair, and what products work best for our own hair I just don’t like. I don’t think that the writer is “hating”, just sharing her opinion on the subject matter. I hope that it really sheds light that the issue to me is bigger than us selling our ideas for money, it’s about women, black women being creative and creating a market for each other and that’s what I fell in love with. Going forward I will try not to lose sight of that when choosing a site to support and products to purchase.

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  33. I personally have no problem with beautiful Black women making money the good ol honest way.. however, I truly think there is much propaganda with the YT Volggers and the this Curlynikki site. When I 1st logged onto it about a year ago I couldn't understand all of the curly white women that I saw on the sight.. I was at a lost wondering it their intentions were for 'curly' individuals in oppose to 'kinky". I mean really to me the entire natural hair movement gave me a platform of YES MY HAIR IS NAPPY IM DARK WITH BOLD FEATURES AND YES I AM BEAUTIFUL. No other time were women with these particular characteristics looked upon as beautiful in mainstream media or on the 'streets'. YT helps me get through the beginning stages from BC to late. I just can not stand the bounce from product to product and each product that is being reviewed 'paid reviewed' is FANTASTIC.. I mean really?? if you weren't paid would it be all that/ then the prices are off the chains.. making it so easy for woman to become PJ in their early stages of their natural hair journey. I often wondered if the products the gurus gave rave reviews were an actual constant goto in their hair care regime? Then it went from products and more products to over the top Natural Hair meetups... I refuse to pay $50^ for tickets to basically see a YT guru.. and then you would see the same gurus at every meetup across the country REALLY when we as a nation (and especially the black community) are just peeping out of a recession. But, then on the other side if you as a person would invest your money into being a PJ or a countrywide traveler to go to meetups then that's on you. I guess it was obvious the channels would evolve from FAB tutorials that was helpful to so many to more of infomercial channels. There are many that are still on YT and have Blog sites as a communication devise while still making money but not so much up in your face (including this NEW BLOG/VLOG site you have created). Thank you for a platform to speak and share and 'keeping it real' on many subjects over the years Africanexport.

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  34. Actually, I don't find this disturbing at all. I found myself feeling a little comforted by the fact that the two white owners not only have an interest in curly hair, but they have curly hair themselves. Maybe not kinky, but I've met MANY people of other ethic origins, white and non-white, that have an interest in black hair. I don't see the issue. That's what we want right? To be different but our differences accepted and part of the conversation right?

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  35. Honestly I have founded it easier to relate with those who "look like me" when it comes to the issue of "our hair". I fully understand "Ms. Anonymous" POV but as many other ladies have said before it's all about that mighty dollar. Who can blame other races trying to get a hand in the Black Hair industry? It's way to much profit involved to just ignore. The reason why I feel black people are not owning "black hair care" or any "black marketed products" is for the same reason @Kina stated above: "...the African American race can be a bit impatient and not willing to wait for the big pay off." It's sad but overall the black community is all about becoming RICH instead of becoming WEALTHY. Think about it : SOME of our black men are inspiring to become ballers and rappers instead of doctors and businessmen. We are inspired to buy "Bling" and "big flashy cars"
    all of which will decrease in value after being bought(instead of buying things like land that over time will increase in value...if well kept of course). And the same goes for SOME black ladies in the natural hair industy...we want the money and we want it NOW. Like I stated before I would love to see more black faces behind black marketed products but in order for this to happen the entire black community (not only the black naturals) have to come together and EDUCATE one another one the idea of becoming WEALTHY not RICH. We have to come back together and support one another and stop "backstabbing" each other. This is how other races are getting ahead and we seem to be lacking. Other races have learned the idea of coming wealthy and investing in "their own" products. It's time for the black community to take action for change and come bond together as we have done in the past. Our histroy has showed that we can do it; we need to get back on that track.

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  36. I thought I would put my little two cent in!

    I don't know if Ms. Anonymous is hating but with that bankroll comment she does sound a little salty!

    I think though she has a point...sorta. When we all watched that Chris Rock documentary and saw how much profit other races were making on something that soley marketed to us it stung a little. Now that it seems like we are getting on the right track and "sticking it to the man" by going natural the "white devil" has stuck it's claws back into our money again!

    I think what we really need to do (and what I think Chris Rock was trying to do) is not blame the other race and get out there and take some control.

    I think that the vloggers and bloggers are doing just that and maybe someone else needs to take it even further and become that person that turns natural hair into a company! We got a lotta complaining going on but who cares if there isn't going to be any action behind it?

    I, for one, don't really care where the information comes from as long as it's good information but if you do care, take the bull by the horns and do something about it!

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  37. I understand the author of this letter totally. I don't think she is upset that curly Nikki is making money from her site, it's the fact that she sold her site to another nonblack business owner. Couldn't she have grown her site without selling it? I am on the quest to open a beauty supply store in my area but in my research am finding that Koreans have this market locked down! This is pathetic! This is a market which overflowing with black dollars but yet less than 3% is black owned. Come on really! Black businesses need to stop selling out, keep it within our community. We keep asking what can we do, everyone knows that this is an issue. But as long as we keep saying I don't care as long as my hair is healthy, I don't care as long as I get the information, I don't care as long as I can find my favorite product then it doesn't make sense to ask what can we do about it because nobody cares enough to stop the cycle. Heard of the term "old money"? You know money & wealth passed down from generation to generation. How many black families do that? Very few because we too busy selling to non whites so they can create something to pass down to their children.

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  38. Sorry meant to type selling to nonblanks.....lol

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  39. If you can get paid whilst writing your blog, doing what started off as a bit of fun, then get paid. All I ask if that you don't sell your integrity for a cheque and started writing a bunch of bullshity sponsored posts more than your own content.

    On a side note, it is disappointing that CurlyNikki isn't owned by us Id it had to be bought by anyone at all), but as usual, we're catch on too late to a good thing and have the rug pulled from under us!

    Ironically I don't even read it that much, I prefer other bloggers/vloggers as I get a commericalism vibe off it at times.

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  40. My issue is that we give everything and own NOTHING. Say what you will about Kimmaytube but she's a smart cookie and is not willing to be a puppet or a "face" for the benefit of some conglomerate. Also, I LOVE Kim Coles, but she's been "natural" for 3 seconds. Some of us have been natural or transitioning for years. How can a johnny come lately come up and suddenly be the celebrity spokesperson for a movement that was here before she cut out her weave? Imjustsayin. And who says we need a spokesperson anyway? I thought the point was to take ownership of what belongs to us and start putting some of that buying power and money back into our own pockets and communities, not selling out to the first person who offfers us a few pennies on the dollar. All that being said, I don't feel the author of the letter was "hatin". I see her as firing a warning shot- because if this keeps up we'll be locked out of ownership yet again and we'll be looking to other races to supply our needs like we've been doing for the last 400 years. Enough is enough.

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  41. I feel like this issue has so many layers that its sort of diffucult to address it without stepping on the toes of another issue.
    I think that there is an issue with non-African Americans owning a large sum of the Natural hair community...when it comes to AA's everyone else tells us what to do, when to do it, and how to make our money, "they" even give us the opportunity to make it.

    Doesnt it seem sorta off that AA's arent majority owning things that are made for AA's?

    or is that just business as usual?

    speaking about the vloggers...i subcribe to some of the above named...and have questioned one of the above's integrity..it seemed that is all of this persons reviews she always loved a product, never had an issue, didnt hate it...I honestly stopped watching the videos cuz im like "dude, you aint likin' AAAAALLLL these products...c'mon now!"

    So all in all...I think the issue has many ways it can be viwed...and I think that the natural hair community has created a sense of culture...in a people that it would seem dont have a culture...i think thats why folks are so touchy about letting non-AA's in...its like a "this is our club"...and non-AA already have a "club"...but soon as AA get thier own, there they go (again) swooping in at any opportunity to own someones elses something!

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  42. I don't mean any disrespect at all, but should we be trying to tell other people how to run their own businesses? If you have a business and you don't want it run by white people that is awesome. If you want to get with like minded people and boycott websites that are not fully black owned do your thang. But to have a problem with people that don't do what you want them to is not cool. It's like the natural girl that looks down her nose at the the relaxed girl because she doesn't want to go natural. I say let people live life the way they see fit.

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  43. Please correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't the CEO of Youtube/Google a white man named Eric Schmidt? So technically, the argument made in this post could be argued about any of the natural hair vloggers on Youtube, as well. None of the natural hair vloggers own Youtube. But there are many out there who are getting paid by Mr. Schmidt and his advertising sources for doing what they do best. As long as the information is positively contributing to the natural hair community, I don't see what all the hoopla is about.

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  44. Seems to me that some African Americans are just getting ridiculous with passing stuff on to others and they should run it and be proud of who they are to help others instead of looking into money. The majority of the time the Caucasians always trying to run something to make them look good. It's a shame how one can't embrace their own culture. African Americans we must get it together.

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  45. Well this is how I'm feeling it frustrates me alot. It's just my feelings and growing up to see things like this happen time and time again. Ex. BET. That is all and have a Happy New Year Everybody!!

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  46. sad that they are selling out their hard work. But some choose money over purpose

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  47. @TH Exactly! I've decided to do my part to support more black owned business this year a al the Empowerment project of 2009 http://www.theempowermentexperiment.blogspot.com/2009/01/middle-class-chicago-family-commits-to.html

    "Thanks for posting the letter. I get what the anonymous poster is trying to say and I didn't get that she was trying to "hate" on the bloggers/vloggers that are being paid by non-black sources.

    The problem is not that bloggers/vloggers are paid for their product reviews or website content. The problem is that HISTORY IS REPEATING ITSELF ONCE AGAIN. Non-black companies are now using black bloggers/vloggers to gain FINANCIAL inroads into the natural hair industry so we will once again become dependent on non-black hair companies for our products.

    I'm all for entrepreneurs getting paid and growing their business and I don't blame alicia one bit for selling her business to naturallycurly.com; it was a good business move for HER but I don't think it was good for the black women of the natural hair community.

    This has always happened to us. Small black companies grow their reputation and customer base and get bought out by non-black companies which do not recycle those dollars back into the black communities that they serve. I do have a problem with that. But as we all know money talks and that's all anyone REALLY cares about."

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  48. Interesting letter to say the least. Why is it that Latifa can represent Cover Girl, Halle is not pushing Afro Sheen, but sisters who start out on their own can be brutalized by others who simply want what they have and have not been successful. This is another prime example of crabs doing some serious hair pulling ladies. Given that I had have my hair seriously pulled by women of my own race as well. This is the natural progression of business. So did Dark and Lovely approach any of these sites, hell no, because they want to keep pushing the creamy crack, instead of joining the movement. Guess what ladies very few our the businesses that we think are black owned are. WE OWN NOTHING, WE DO NOT HELP EACH OTHER! This letter is sad to me. Nikki approached me to do an article on my hair, I was honored. I did not speak with anyone but Nikki. I am sure if a black company had approached her and you don't even know that this information is correct. I am so tired of us doing this to each other, divide and conquer. To the blackinformant who is not confident enough to put her name on this tidbit of venom, I stand behind my name and always will. I know how prominent black folks are, and the motto for us is what's mine will stay mine, get you own. Nikki stay strong, keep it moving sister, you are doing a great job, this letter will only make me more loyal.
    janet hubert

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  49. WEEEELLLLLL!! What can we say? Us Black people could stand strong together and be a solid force to be reckoned with. We could take care of each other,build each other up and build our empires, Especially those that are specific to us.

    Instead, we do light skinned vs dark skin, loose curl vs tight curl, black on black crime, etc. THEN All the rest of us are just watered down and indifferent about everything. AHH...Live and let live! Then you have a few of us who give a darn but ..... so what.

    It's been this way since forever. Black people had to sell black people FIRST for us to be brought into slavery. This situation has never stopped.

    Now all somebody has to do is wave some green in our faces for us to give away our selves, security and our power up once again. Oh I'm sure that in the immediate, Ol girl is doing well. But how much longer can that last. She is under someone elses terms about stuff SHE BUILT.... Sound Familiar???? Plus at any moment it could all be just swept right from under her feet if someone wanted....

    We once again become those insignifant consumers making the significant wealthy. (Oxymoron,, but real)

    In case anybody was wondering, I'm not militant at all. I'm just telling the way it is and alway has been. Everybody wants success and wealth but just think of how much success we could have if we supported one another and had even just a little bit of power.

    Big Buisness, Elite, Organization, Ownership of EVERYTHING..... all of these things.... white people. They know how to get together and get things done on ANOTHER LEVEL. No BULLCRAP!

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  50. I think the individual was just expressing her opinions. However, I'm sick and tired of black people constantly whining about how whites and Asians and Latinos and Native Americans and everybody else are taking advantage of us. If you're unhappy about it...DO SOMETHING! Honestly, I don't care who's giving me tips to help care for my natural hair. As long as they know what they're talking about and can back it up with scientific proof, I'm sold. I'm not into the whole "black sell out" thing. Let's face it: we live in the U.S. There are more Latinos, whites and Asians than there are blacks (and American Indians). Somebody's going to realize a good business deal when they see one! I don't care that CurlyNikki.com is owned by 2 white women. When we as a people protested in the 60s and 70s about being discriminated against because of the color of our skin, did we forget that it can go the other way, too? Why are we up in arms about this? Does it really matter that much? Can we focus on issues that are actually more important in the long run - like Jesus Christ? Or must we quibble and backbite over every minute issue?
    Just my 0.02

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